26 7 / 2014

"I’m not good with numbers."

Math professor (via mathprofessorquotes)

25 7 / 2014

A 2012 study comparing 16-to-65-year-olds in 20 countries found that Americans rank in the bottom five in numeracy. On a scale of 1 to 5, 29 percent of them scored at Level 1 or below, meaning they could do basic arithmetic but not computations requiring two or more steps. One study that examined medical prescriptions gone awry found that 17 percent of errors were caused by math mistakes on the part of doctors or pharmacists. A survey found that three-quarters of doctors inaccurately estimated the rates of death and major complications associated with common medical procedures, even in their own specialty areas. 

"One of the most vivid arithmetic failings displayed by Americans occurred in the early 1980s, when the A&W restaurant chain released a new hamburger to rival the McDonald’s Quarter Pounder. With a third-pound of beef, the A&W burger had more meat than the Quarter Pounder; in taste tests, customers preferred A&W’s burger. And it was less expensive. A lavish A&W television and radio marketing campaign cited these benefits. Yet instead of leaping at the great value, customers snubbed it.

"Only when the company held customer focus groups did it become clear why. The Third Pounder presented the American public with a test in fractions. And we failed. Misunderstanding the value of one-third, customers believed they were being overcharged. Why, they asked the researchers, should they pay the same amount for a third of a pound of meat as they did for a quarter-pound of meat at McDonald’s. The “4” in “¼,” larger than the “3” in “⅓,” led them astray

"To cure our innumeracy, we will have to accept that the traditional approach we take to teaching math — the one that can be mind-numbing, but also comfortingly familiar — does not work. We will have to come to see math not as a list of rules to be memorized but as a way of looking at the world that really makes sense."

(Source: mathematica)

21 7 / 2014

"There are two great mysteries that overshadow all other mysteries in science. One is the origin of the universe. That’s my day job. However, there is also the other great mystery of inner space. And that is what sits on your shoulders, which believe it or not, is the most complex object in the known universe. But the brain only uses 20 watts of power. It would require a nuclear power plant to energise a computer the size of a city block to mimic your brain, and your brain does it with just 20 watts. So if someone calls you a dim bulb, that’s a compliment."

09 7 / 2014

dharkannn:

ryanandmath:

How to read math. You’d be surprised how far this will get you.

EDIT: Some corrections

*__*

(via sarcastic-snowflake)

07 7 / 2014

ryanandmath:

How to solve a quartic polynomial (i.e. good luck)

(Source: plus.google.com, via visualizingmath)

01 7 / 2014

mindfuckmath:

This is why Google is awesome
10 years ago this month, Google placed this anonymous billboard on Highway 101 in the heart of Silicon Valley.  Once you figured out the answer and entered in the correct URL, you were taken to a page directing you to the next level of testing.  In case you’re wondering what the first 10-digit prime found in consecutive digits of e is, the answer can be found here.

mindfuckmath:

This is why Google is awesome

10 years ago this month, Google placed this anonymous billboard on Highway 101 in the heart of Silicon Valley.  Once you figured out the answer and entered in the correct URL, you were taken to a page directing you to the next level of testing.  In case you’re wondering what the first 10-digit prime found in consecutive digits of e is, the answer can be found here.

(via mathematica)

30 6 / 2014

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

How a hole is drilled to be made square, the red shape in the center would be the cutting tool.
it shares the same principle as a Reuleaux triangle but with one rounded corner so that the cut square does not have rounded edges; the cutting tool follows the path of the rounded edge that is tangent to the sides of the outer square. because a tangent line is perpendicular to the radius, as the cutting tool follows the path of the rounded edge it turns precisely 90° to create a sharp edged perfect square.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

How a hole is drilled to be made square, the red shape in the center would be the cutting tool.

it shares the same principle as a Reuleaux triangle but with one rounded corner so that the cut square does not have rounded edges; the cutting tool follows the path of the rounded edge that is tangent to the sides of the outer square. because a tangent line is perpendicular to the radius, as the cutting tool follows the path of the rounded edge it turns precisely 90° to create a sharp edged perfect square.

(via nerdymathgeek)

29 6 / 2014

istolemycroftsumbrella:

Sine waves in nature

istolemycroftsumbrella:

Sine waves in nature

(via mathmajik)

28 6 / 2014

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS >|< Journey to the Center of a Triangle (1976)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: Academic Film Archive of North America
 | Download: Ogg | 512Kb MPEG4 | MPEG2
 | Digital Copy: not specified


A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Journey to the Center of a Triangle (1977): another fabulous film by the Cornwells, created on the Tektronics 4051 Graphics Terminal. Presents a series of animated constructions that determine the center of a variety of triangles, including such centers as circumcenter, incenter, centroid and orthocenter. More on the Cornwells at http://www.afana.org/cornwell.htm

According to son Eric Cornwell, here’s how the film was made: The 4051 produced only black and green vector images, not even grey scale. The film’s scenes were divided into layers in the programming, one layer for each of the colors in the scene, and each was shot separately onto high-contrast fine-grained b&w film stock. The final scene in “Journey” had 5 layers: one for each of the four colored dots, plus one for the white triangle and line. 

These five clips were then multiple-exposed onto color film on an optical printer, using colored filters to add the desired color to each black&white layer as it was copied. The resulting color was much better than a film of an RGB display would have been because the color filters on the optical printer allowed access to the full range of the color negative film, allowing much more saturated colors. All of that color is pretty much lost now, between prints fading and/or transfers to the VHS, and then viewing them on a computer screen which has a much more limited color gamut. Please imagine it all in bright, brilliant colors. (from Internet Archive)

We invite you to watch the full video HERE.




EXCERPTS by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/historical/rare/controversial moving images. 
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<

(via nerdymathgeek)

28 6 / 2014

amelie-elyse:

The Laws of Thermodynamics - graphics

photo credits: 1 2 3

Editing program: Ribbet

(via nerdymathgeek)