23 8 / 2014

brokvisk:

Numbers are simple.

brokvisk:

Numbers are simple.

(via visualizingmath)

17 8 / 2014

matthen:

Creating the Sierpinski triangle fractal with rotating triangles. [more] [code] [inspiration]

matthen:

Creating the Sierpinski triangle fractal with rotating triangles. [more] [code] [inspiration]

(via mathmajik)

16 8 / 2014

"It’s the warmth of mathematics, warming your heart."

Calculus teacher in response to a student commenting that the room was warm (via mathprofessorquotes)

15 8 / 2014

(Source: jostamon, via mathematica)

02 8 / 2014

curiosamathematica:

Archimedes proved that the volumes of a sphere and a cone with equal radius and height add up to the volume of a cylinder with the same dimensions. This inspired Rod Bogart to make this charming hourglass.

curiosamathematica:

Archimedes proved that the volumes of a sphere and a cone with equal radius and height add up to the volume of a cylinder with the same dimensions. This inspired Rod Bogart to make this charming hourglass.

(via mathmajik)

01 8 / 2014

teded:

Playing music requires fine motor skills, which are controlled in both hemispheres of the brain. It also combines the linguistic and mathematical precision (which the left hemisphere is more involved in) with the novel and creative content (that the right hemisphere excels in). For these reasons, playing music has been found to increase the volume and activity in the brain’s corpus callosum - the bridge between the two hemispheres - allowing messages to get across the brain faster and through more diverse routes. 
From the TED-Ed lesson How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins
Animation by Sharon Colman Graham

teded:

Playing music requires fine motor skills, which are controlled in both hemispheres of the brain. It also combines the linguistic and mathematical precision (which the left hemisphere is more involved in) with the novel and creative content (that the right hemisphere excels in). For these reasons, playing music has been found to increase the volume and activity in the brain’s corpus callosum - the bridge between the two hemispheres - allowing messages to get across the brain faster and through more diverse routes. 

From the TED-Ed lesson How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

Animation by Sharon Colman Graham

(via science-junkie)

26 7 / 2014

"I’m not good with numbers."

Math professor (via mathprofessorquotes)

25 7 / 2014

A 2012 study comparing 16-to-65-year-olds in 20 countries found that Americans rank in the bottom five in numeracy. On a scale of 1 to 5, 29 percent of them scored at Level 1 or below, meaning they could do basic arithmetic but not computations requiring two or more steps. One study that examined medical prescriptions gone awry found that 17 percent of errors were caused by math mistakes on the part of doctors or pharmacists. A survey found that three-quarters of doctors inaccurately estimated the rates of death and major complications associated with common medical procedures, even in their own specialty areas. 

"One of the most vivid arithmetic failings displayed by Americans occurred in the early 1980s, when the A&W restaurant chain released a new hamburger to rival the McDonald’s Quarter Pounder. With a third-pound of beef, the A&W burger had more meat than the Quarter Pounder; in taste tests, customers preferred A&W’s burger. And it was less expensive. A lavish A&W television and radio marketing campaign cited these benefits. Yet instead of leaping at the great value, customers snubbed it.

"Only when the company held customer focus groups did it become clear why. The Third Pounder presented the American public with a test in fractions. And we failed. Misunderstanding the value of one-third, customers believed they were being overcharged. Why, they asked the researchers, should they pay the same amount for a third of a pound of meat as they did for a quarter-pound of meat at McDonald’s. The “4” in “¼,” larger than the “3” in “⅓,” led them astray

"To cure our innumeracy, we will have to accept that the traditional approach we take to teaching math — the one that can be mind-numbing, but also comfortingly familiar — does not work. We will have to come to see math not as a list of rules to be memorized but as a way of looking at the world that really makes sense."

(Source: mathematica)

21 7 / 2014

"There are two great mysteries that overshadow all other mysteries in science. One is the origin of the universe. That’s my day job. However, there is also the other great mystery of inner space. And that is what sits on your shoulders, which believe it or not, is the most complex object in the known universe. But the brain only uses 20 watts of power. It would require a nuclear power plant to energise a computer the size of a city block to mimic your brain, and your brain does it with just 20 watts. So if someone calls you a dim bulb, that’s a compliment."

09 7 / 2014

dharkannn:

ryanandmath:

How to read math. You’d be surprised how far this will get you.

EDIT: Some corrections

*__*

(via sarcastic-snowflake)