12 10 / 2014

infinitemachine:

toothlessrebel:

asgardiantelevision:

image

Doesn’t look like a limerick to you? Try this:

A dozen, a gross, and a score
Plus three times the square root of four
Divided by seven
Plus five times eleven
Is nine squared and not a bit more.

THE FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCCCKKKKKKK

::Slow applause::

(via nerdymathgeek)

11 10 / 2014

scientific-women:

huffingtonpost:

Are Nasty Comments Like These Keeping Women Out Of Science?

"It’s death by a thousand cuts. Every day you’re faced with some comment, some snide remark, some inability to get a name on a research paper. And with an accumulation of those experiences, women tend to walk with their feet."

Go here to read more infuriating stories about women in science. 

This is what we’re talking about.

(via sarcastic-snowflake)

02 10 / 2014

theinspirationjourney:

"Mathematics is the hidden architecture of the Universe."

theinspirationjourney:

"Mathematics is the hidden architecture of the Universe."

(via mathematica)

27 9 / 2014

"Did I make my life any easier? No! I made it worse."

Integration by parts goes wrong (via mathprofessorquotes)

22 9 / 2014

"You all can figure it out it’s not… well… maybe it is rocket science."

Calculus professor at GA Tech (via mathprofessorquotes)

07 9 / 2014

spring-of-mathematics:

Golden Ratio φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2 = 1.6180339887498948482…
In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. Expressed algebraically, for quantities a and b with a > b > 0. Two quantities a and b are said to be in the golden ratio φ if
(a+b)/a = a/b = φ
One method for finding the value of φ is to start with the left fraction. Through simplifying the fraction and substituting in b/a = 1/φ:
(a+b)/a = 1+ b/a = 1+1/φ
Therefore: 1+1/φ = φ  Multiplying by φ gives: φ^2 - φ - 1 = 0
Using the quadratic formula, two solutions are obtained:: 
φ = (1- sqrt(5))/2 or φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2
Because φ is the ratio between positive quantities φ is necessarily positive:
φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2 = 1.6180339887498948482…
See more at Golden Ratio.
Image: Phi (golden number) by Steve Lewis.

spring-of-mathematics:

Golden Ratio φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2 = 1.6180339887498948482…

In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. Expressed algebraically, for quantities a and b with a > b > 0. Two quantities a and b are said to be in the golden ratio φ if

(a+b)/a = a/b = φ

One method for finding the value of φ is to start with the left fraction. Through simplifying the fraction and substituting in b/a = 1/φ:

(a+b)/a = 1+ b/a = 1+1/φ

Therefore: 1+1/φ = φ 
Multiplying by φ gives: φ^2 - φ - 1 = 0

Using the quadratic formula, two solutions are obtained::

φ = (1- sqrt(5))/2 or φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2

Because φ is the ratio between positive quantities φ is necessarily positive:

φ = (1+sqrt(5))/2 = 1.6180339887498948482…

See more at Golden Ratio.

Image: Phi (golden number) by Steve Lewis.

(via mindfuckmath)

23 8 / 2014

brokvisk:

Numbers are simple.

brokvisk:

Numbers are simple.

(via visualizingmath)

17 8 / 2014

matthen:

Creating the Sierpinski triangle fractal with rotating triangles. [more] [code] [inspiration]

matthen:

Creating the Sierpinski triangle fractal with rotating triangles. [more] [code] [inspiration]

(via mathmajik)

16 8 / 2014

"It’s the warmth of mathematics, warming your heart."

Calculus teacher in response to a student commenting that the room was warm (via mathprofessorquotes)

15 8 / 2014

(Source: jostamon, via mathematica)